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Insulin Resistence: What Do Some Researchers Say?

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Aging, Insulin

To review, By Controlling Insulin, You May Be Controlling Aging

When we eat, our bodies release insulin into our blood stream so that we can process glucose (sugars) from our foods to make energy, especially in our muscles.

Glucose belongs in our cells and not in our blood. When it remains in our blood we produce more insulin. Increased insulin, according to many researchers, is the number one factor for accelerated aging.

Glucose
Our cells need glucose for many things including energy, metabolism, and for mood and cognitive function. The short term benefit of eating a candy bar, besides its good taste, has long been know by athletes and students, sugar gives you energy and makes you think straight, that is, in the short-term.

The reason we cannot eat glucose all the time is obvious. It is not good for us, we would get fat, develop insulin resistance, and then diabetes.

When we eat too much glucose, as sugar or in the form of carbohydrates, the more insulin will be needed to be released to usher the glucose into the cells. If we are not “burning it off,” the glucose is stored for later use.

When we have too much glucose in our cells, our bodies try to stop insulin from stuffing more in there. Suddenly we are programmed to ignore insulin’s attempts to process glucose. The pancreas, from where insulin is made, still senses high levels of glucose in the blood, it thinks it is not sending our enough insulin, therefore it sends out more. Unfortunately the more it sends, the more gets ignored. We are now resisting insulin’s attempts at glucose regulation, we have become “Insulin Resistant.” This cycle continues until the pancreas becomes exhausted and no longer produces insulin, this is Type-Two Diabetes (diabetes mellitus).

Heart Health

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Heart Health

Testosterone May Protect Against Hardening Of The Arteries
Testosterone supplementation has received a fair share of “bad press.” Mostly due to health problems (sterility, coronary artery disease, liver damage, and brain tumors), caused in young men and women who should not be taking testosterone supplementation, but do so at super-physiological doses, to enhance athletic performance.

The Sooner You Cut Your Risk For Cardiovascular Disease The Longer You Will Live
Writing in the medical journal Circulation, researchers say that if you are at low risk for cardiovascular disease at age 50, it is unlikely that you will suffer from heart disease in your lifetime and that compared to others in the same age group with higher risk, men could expect to live 11 more years and women 9 more years.

Does Being Optimistic Really Lower Risk From Cardiovascular Disease in Elderly Men?
Researchers writing in the medical journal the Archives of Internal Medicine say that having an optimistic outlook, DOES lower mortality risk associated with cardiovascular disease.

Menopause and Heart Disease
researchers writing in the medical journal Climacteric say that “an ideal hormone replacement therapy that can overcome hypertension, prevent body weight gain and control serum triglycerides offers an important advance in cardiovascular risk management during the menopause.”

Testosterone, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease
New research says Testosterone may have a protective role in the development of metabolic syndrome and subsequent diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in aging men.

Exercise Frequency in Older Women

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Exercise

Researchers writing in the Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics say “older women who participate in an exercise program three times a week gain greater functional fitness benefits than those who exercise less frequently.”

Nakamura Y, Tanaka K, Yabushita N, Sakai T, Shigematsu R. Effects of exercise frequency on functional fitness in older adult women. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2007 Mar-Apr;44(2):163-73.

From the study abstract: This study evaluated the effects of exercise frequency on functional fitness in older women participating in a 12-week exercise program.

Participants (67.8+/-4.6 years) were divided into three different exercise groups (I, II, and III; n=34) and a control group (Group C; n=11). Group I participated in a 90-min exercise program once a week, for 12 weeks, while Group II attended it twice a week, and Group III attended three times a week.

The exercise program consisted of a 10-min warm-up, 20min of walking, 30min of recreational activities, 20min of resistance training, and a 10-min cool-down.

The following items were measured before and after the program: muscular strength, muscular endurance, dynamic balance, coordination, and cardiorespiratory fitness (6-min walking distance).

Comparisons of baseline and post-intervention measures showed significantly greater improvements in body weight, coordination, and cardiorespiratory fitness for Group III compared to the other groups (p<0.05).

In addition, the greatest improvements in body fat, muscular endurance, and dynamic balance were also observed in Group III (p<0.05). However, no significant differences were found in muscular strength.

Older women who participate in an exercise program three times a week gain greater functional fitness benefits than those who exercise less frequently. In order to improve functional fitness in older women, an exercise frequency of at least three times each week should be recommended.

Aging Men and Their Hormones

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Aging

Writing in the medical journal Minerva Ginecologica, researchers say that “The ability to maintain active and independent living for as long as possible is a crucial factor for (aging healthfully)” and that “Interventions such as hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing the preventable and delaying the inevitable.”

Lunenfeld B. Endocrinology of the aging male. Minerva Ginecol. 2006 Apr;58(2):153-70.

From the study abstract:
“Despite enormous medical progress during the past few decades, the last years of life are still accompanied by increasing ill health and disability.

The ability to maintain active and independent living for as long as possible is a crucial factor for ageing healthily and with dignity. The most important and drastic gender differences in aging are related to the reproductive organs. In distinction to the course of reproductive ageing in women, with the rapid decline in sex hormones expressed by the cessation of menses, men experience a slow and continuous decline. This decline in endocrine function involves: a decrease of testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), oestrogens, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), growth hormone (GH), IGF1, and melatonin.

The decrease of sex hormones is concomitant with a temporary increase of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). In addition sex hormone binding globulins (SHBG) increase with age resulting in further lowering the concentrations of free biologically active androgens.

These hormonal changes are directly or indirectly associated with changes in body constitution, fat distribution (visceral obesity), muscle weakness, osteopenia, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction.

The laboratory and clinical findings of partial endocrine deficiencies in the aging male will be described and discussed in detail. With the prolongation of life expectancy both women and men today live 1/3 of their life with endocrine deficiencies. Interventions such as hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing the preventable and delaying the inevitable.”

Article Notes:
Luteinizing hormone is produced in the pituary gland and helps regulate the production of testosterone.
Follicle-stimulating hormone is produced in the pituary gland and helps regulate the production of sperm.

Predicting Mortality: Researchers Have A Formula

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Aging

Lee SJ, Lindquist K, Segal MR, Covinsky KE, Development and Validation of a Prognostic Index for 4-Year Mortality in Older Adults. JAMA. 2006;295:801-808.

From the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
ABSTRACT: “Context Both comorbid conditions and functional measures predict mortality in older adults, but few prognostic indexes combine both classes of predictors. Combining easily obtained measures into an accurate predictive model could be useful to clinicians advising patients, as well as policy makers and epidemiologists interested in risk adjustment.

Objective: To develop and validate a prognostic index for 4-year mortality using information that can be obtained from patient report.

Results:…Twelve independent predictors of mortality were identified: 2 demographic variables (age: 60-64 years, 1 point; 65-69 years, 2 points; 70-74 years, 3 points; 75-79 years, 4 points; 80-84 years, 5 points, >85 years, 7 points and (being male), 2 points), 6 comorbid conditions (diabetes, 1 point; cancer, 2 points; lung disease, 2 points; heart failure, 2 points; current tobacco use, 2 points; and body mass index <25, 1 point), and difficulty with 4 functional variables (bathing, 2 points; walking several blocks, 2 points; managing money, 2 points, and pushing large objects, 1 point. Scores on the risk index were strongly associated with 4-year mortality in the validation cohort, with 0 to 5 points predicting a less than 4% risk, 6 to 9 points predicting a 15% risk, 10 to 13 points predicting a 42% risk, and 14 or more points predicting a 64% risk….

Conclusion: This prognostic index, incorporating age, sex, self-reported comorbid conditions, and functional measures, accurately stratifies community-dwelling older adults into groups at varying risk of mortality.

Aging

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Aging

Researchers look at what makes people age successfully
Factors associated with the successful aging of the socially-active elderly in the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre. Rev Bras Psiquiatr. 2005 Dec;27(4):302-308. Moraes JF, Souza VB.

Writing in the medical journal Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, researchers studied some of the inhabitants of the metropolitan region of the Brazialian city Porto Alegre. What they sought to do was “identify the factors associated with aging of the socially-active elderly in the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre.” Read more

Predicting Mortality: Researchers Have A Formula
From the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
ABSTRACT: “Context Both comorbid conditions and functional measures predict mortality in older adults, but few prognostic indexes combine both classes of predictors. Combining easily obtained measures into an accurate predictive model could be useful to clinicians advising patients, as well as policy makers and epidemiologists interested in risk adjustment. Read more

Researchers Say Marital Strain Can Affect Aging
You make me sick: marital quality and health over the life course. Umberson D, Williams K, Powers DA, Liu H, Needham B.J Health Soc Behav. 2006 Mar;47(1):1-16.

From the press release of the American Sociological Association:
“Researchers have found that marital strain accelerates the typical decline in self-rated physical health that occurs over time and that this adverse effect is greater at older ages. As men and women age, they become increasingly vulnerable to marital stress, according to a team of sociologists from the University of Texas-Austin and Ohio State University. Their findings appear in an article on marital quality and health over the life course in this month’s Journal of Health and Social Behavior, a publication of the American Sociological Association.”

Click here to go to our links page for the press release from American Sociological Association

Aging Men and Their Hormones
Writing in the medical journal Minerva Ginecologica, researchers say that “The ability to maintain active and independent living for as long as possible is a crucial factor for (aging healthfully)” and that “Interventions such as hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing the preventable and delaying the inevitable.”

Why Do Some People Age Healthily and Happily, While others do not?
Coping with Stress and Adversity May Be A Key

Arizona State University researchers will begin a five year study to examine how “factors of risk and resilience contribute to health and well-being.” Read more

Healthwath with Dr. Darrow on KCAL-TV CBS NEWS : Women and Hormones

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Videos

Insulin Resistance Tied To Age-Related Muscle Loss

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Insulin

Writing in the medical journal Diabetes and Metabolism, researchers say: “…insulin resistance could be involved in age-related muscle protein loss, progressively leading to sarcopenia. Therefore in a more general concept, insulin resistance found in many clinical settings, could be considered as a contributor to muscle wasting.”

Guillet C, Boirie Y. Insulin resistance: a contributing factor to age-related muscle mass loss? Diabetes Metab. 2005 Dec;31 Spec No 2:20-6.

Read more

Related Articles
Insulin Resistance, Weight Gain Lead to Early Aging
“Tulane University researchers are the first to demonstrate a biological link between insulin resistance, weight gain and signs of early aging in the blood…”

Why am I so driven to work in the age management field?

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

Basically it was for my own personal, mental, and spiritual well being.

A few years back when I was in my early forties, I began to notice a significant decrease in my energy levels. In other words, I was dragging.

I also noticed that I was losing muscle mass, I was getting softer. I didn’t have the energy to “pump up,” anymore and I was not able to exercise at levels I was accustomed to. “Well, that’s it, I am getting old,” I thought.

I was at a medical convention and spoke to a colleague about “my condition,” and he suggested that I should get my hormone levels checked. When I got my test results back my testosterone levels were so low they didn’t make the charts; way below the normal of anyone I had ever seen before.

Suffice to say, my curiosity in hormone supplementation was sparked. Because my testosterone was so very low and testosterone is the well known builder of bone, I immediately got a Bone Densitometry Test to measure my bone density. I was stunned as the tech told me the news in disbelief. It was very low as well, putting me at a high risk for fracture. I was absolutely stunned, I had to stop a lot of sports I was doing, and loved. I realized that snow skiing, snow shoeing, water skiing, and surfing, some of my favorites, no longer existed for me. No more vacations in the snow or ice. No more high-speed water sports.

It was then that I started to study and research HGH (Human growth hormone), pregenenolone, DHEA, thyroid, Melatonin and the affects of diet on all of them and how the body works with this big maze of hormones to keep people feeling good, not only increasing quality of life but making them healthy on many levels. Initially, I used testosterone intermittently, because of the fear doctors projected based on the problems with body builders, and men with prostate cancer. As I researched more and more, I learned the healthy truth about hormones, and later began total Hormone Replacement Therapy.

As time passed, more and more patients arrived with similar issues that I had, and many with sexual dysfunction. Hormone supplementation was working miracles. I treated friends for free, and eventually learned the art of balancing female hormones. Many relationships were revitalized as the couples individually found their “mojo” again. Romance once again arose in couples that were ready to give it up, because they thought the chemistry was gone.

I have now been doing this work for years and continue to attend different seminars around the country to learn as much new research as possible. The field of age management medicine, as it is called by some is growing so quickly. Us baby boomers expect the best out of life, and demand the best quality of life, which is greatly enhanced by hormone supplementation. My goal in life is to remain young and loving, not only on the inside, but also physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. My children are my finest teachers.

DHEA

April 12, 2011 by  
Filed under DHEA

DHEA is a hormone that can be purchased over-the-counter or via the internet. Be aware that because of the power of DHEA, it, like any medication, should be prescribed only by a doctor versed in age management, and it should be purchased only from a source having a pharmaceutical grade product. Many “supplements” have little of the active ingredient needed to effect the health purposes you, as a patient, need. As such, there are many claims supporting its usage and some information on contraindications. This section will present both sides and discuss DHEA’s clinical use.

Potential Positive Effects of DHEA:
– Positive effect on mental well being
– Reduction of depression and Alzheimer’s disease
– Increased sex drive
– Increased blood vessel function
– Decreased risk of heart disease
– Increased bone density and decrease in fracture risk
– Increased immune system function
– Reduction of obesity
– Improved insulin sensitivity (lowers insulin levels and helps in weight loss)
– Decreased fatigue
– Increased metabolism
– Decreased plasma cortisol levels (the stress hormone)
– Lowering cholesterol
– Useful for reduction of Lupus related symptoms

Potential Negatives of low DHEA
– Low blood levels of DHEA in the body may contribute to premature aging.
– Low blood levels maybe found in people with osteoporosis.
– Low blood levels maybe found in people with chronic fatigue.
– Low blood levels of DHEA maybe found in people with multiple sclerosis.
– Low blood levels of DHEA maybe found in people with lupus.
– Low blood levels of DHEA maybe found in people with fibromyalgia.

The negatives of superphysiologic levels of DHEA
Unchecked supplementation of DHEA without laboratory and physician supervision can lead to the following in individuals:
– Overdosing of DHEA
– May increase the risk of liver cancer
– May increase the risk of ovarian cancer
– May increase the risk of prostate cancer
– May lower “good” cholesterol
– May cause oily skin and/or acne
– May cause unwanted body hair or other “masculinizing effects” in women.

DHEA, What is it?

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Prolotherapy, PRP, AGE MANAGEMENT MEDICINE, and other modalities mentioned are medical techniques that may not be considered mainstream. As with any medical TREATMENT, results will vary among individuals, and there is no implication that you will HEAL OR receive the same outcome as patients herein. there could be pain or substantial risks involved. These concerns should be discussed with your health care provider prior to any treatment so that you have proper informed consent and understand that there are no guarantees to healing.
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